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Posts Tagged ‘breast cancer’

Previously unseen switch regulates breast cancer response to estrogen

A tiny modification called methylation on estrogen receptors prolongs the life of these growth-driving molecules in breast cancer cells, according to research by scientists at Emory University’s Winship Cancer Institute.

The results are published in the May 9, 2008 issue of the journal Molecular Cell.

Most breast cancers contain estrogen receptors, which enable them to grow in the presence of the hormone estrogen. Their presence can determine whether tumors will respond to the estrogen-blocking drug tamoxifen. … Continue Reading »

Breast cancer tumors grow faster in younger women

A new approach to estimating tumour growth based on breast screening results from almost 400,000 women is published today BioMed Central’s open access journal, Breast Cancer Research. This new model can also estimate the proportion of breast cancers which are detected at screening (screen test sensitivity). It provides a new approach to simultaneously estimating the growth rate of breast cancer and the ability of mammography screening to detect tumours. … Continue Reading »

Cells lining milk ducts hold key to spread of common form of breast cancer

When a form of cancer that begins in the milk ducts of the breast invades neighboring tissue to spread to other parts of the body, the cause lies not in the tumor cells themselves but in a group of abnormal surrounding cells that cause the walls of the duct to deteriorate like a rusty pipe, according to a new study led by Dana-Farber Cancer Institute researchers.

The discovery, reported in the May 6 issue of Cancer Cell, may lead to screening tests to determine whether the disease — known as ductal carcinoma in situ, or DCIS — is likely to spread beyond the ducts, based on genetic abnormalities in cells in the ducts’ lining. And it sets the stage for treatments that, by targeting these abnormalities, shore up the duct walls and keep the cancer contained. … Continue Reading »

Second breast cancer may be greater than thought for high-risk women without BRCA mutations

Finding also raises questions about the use of sentinel node biopsy with prophylactic mastectomies in high-risk women

A preliminary analysis of ongoing research suggests that high-risk women with breast cancer who do not have a BRCA1/2 mutation may face a greater chance for developing a second breast cancer than previously thought. With the increased risk of cancer in these women, should sentinel node biopsy be considered at the time of prophylactic mastectomy, and how can women best be counseled after these findings?

The increased risk of developing breast cancer is already understood for women with the disease who test positive for a BRCA1 or 2 mutation. Many of these women choose to have their breast(s) surgically removed (prophylactic mastectomy) to reduce their risk of developing breast cancer or developing a second breast cancer The role of sentinel node biopsy remains controversial in this group. … Continue Reading »

Variants of vitamin D receptor linked to increased risk of breast cancer

Genetic variations in the body’s receptor for vitamin D could increase the risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women, according to a study published today in the open access journal Breast Cancer Research.

Jenny Chang-Claude of the Division of Cancer Epidemiology, at the German Cancer Research Center, in Heidelberg, and colleagues there and at the Institute for Medical Biometrics and Epidemiology, University Clinic Hamburg-Eppendorf, Germany, undertook a population-based case-control study involving 1,408 patients and 2,612 control individuals. … Continue Reading »

Breast cancer risk amplified by additional genes in combo with BRCA mutation

Many women with a faulty breast cancer gene could be at greater risk of the disease due to extra risk-amplifying genes, according to research published this month in the American Journal of Human Genetics.

Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine join an international consortium of research groups that looked at more than 10,000 women carrying a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation for breast-cancer risk. … Continue Reading »

Ingredient found in green tea significantly inhibits breast cancer growth in female mice

Green tea is high in the antioxidant EGCG (epigallocatechin-3- gallate) which helps prevent the body’s cells from becoming damaged and prematurely aged. Studies have suggested that the combination of green tea and EGCG may also be beneficial by providing protection against certain types of cancers, including breast cancer. A new study conducted by researchers at the University of Mississippi researchers now finds that consuming EGCG significantly inhibits breast tumor growth in female mice. These results bring us one step closer to better understanding the disease and potentially new and naturally occurring therapies.

The study was conducted by Jian-Wei Gu, Emily Young, Jordan Covington, James Wes Johnson, and Wei Tan, all of the Department of Physiology & Biophysics, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS. Dr. Gu will present his team’s findings, entitled, Oral Administration of EGCG, an Antioxidant Found in Green Tea, Inhibits Tumor Angiogenesis and Growth of Breast Cancer in Female Mice, at the 121st Annual Meeting of the American Physiological Society (APS; www.the-APS.org/press), part of the Experimental Biology 2008 scientific conference. … Continue Reading »