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DNA Helix

OpenPCR: DNA amplification for anyone

OpenPCR is a cool new project dedicated to building plans for an open source PCR machine. There’s not much inherently complicated about a PCR machine and it’s about time — a PCR machine built with $300 in parts using a modern software controller will likely be as powerful as any non-realtime PCR out there. Of course, the reagent pricing is what gets you.

Josh and Tito are raising money for this project using Kickstarter. $1024 gets them to build you a PCR machine, which is a reasonably good deal in the scheme of scientific equipment. I gave them $8, because I like stickers and already have a PCR machine that doesn’t exactly get a lot of use.

7 Comments

  1. Jennah said,
    June 27, 2011 @ 12:15 pm

    I’ll try to put this to good use imemdiaetly.

  2. Corey said,
    August 13, 2011 @ 3:15 pm

    I ordered one for our lab, they took the payment. That was 4 months ago. No instrument, no updates.

  3. Ha said,
    August 16, 2011 @ 6:26 pm

    I think it was 512 (now 599) for a machine. Then another 500 to have your name etched in there.

  4. PCR Services said,
    June 20, 2012 @ 4:47 am

    This is goof release of openPCR- DNA amplification.

  5. PCR Services said,
    June 20, 2012 @ 4:47 am

    This is good release of openPCR- DNA amplification.

  6. Doug said,
    September 28, 2012 @ 9:06 am

    It would be interesting to see the quality of the machine. Although I would suspect that the cost to build a decent machine is in the thousand dollar range. I remember one machine we tested years ago consisted of a robotic arm that simply transfered the tubes into three separate water baths with the denature, anneal and extension temperatures. It was fast considering no ramp time.

  7. Glutamate Assay Kit said,
    November 8, 2012 @ 8:56 pm

    Hey friend.

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    Mark Holland